Essential oils made in Quebec!

Discover the many treasures hidden in our forests. Quebec’s emblematic trees and shrubs are the source of many high-quality essential oils known for their therapeutic properties. Their woodsy fragrances evoke nature walks, open spaces, and moments of peace and tranquility. Distilled by local producers, these essential oils are a rich natural resource. We’re proud to share them with you.

Fir Balsam essential oil

Originally from North America, the balsam fir (Abies balsamea) now grows chiefly in northern Quebec. Historically, Aboriginals used this “king of the forest” fir in their pharmacopoeia and believed it to be the toughest and strongest species of conifer. Balsam fir essential oil evokes long walks in the open air.

Fir Balsam essential oil is used in aromatherapy to soothe joint and muscle pains associated with strains, sprains, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Black Spruce essential oil

Black spruce (Picea mariana), also know as bog spruce, is a species of conifer that grows abundantly in the northeast of the United States and in Canada. Black spruce is an emblematic Quebec tree, and its essential oil is renown for its anti-fatigue properties. What’s more, its fresh and resinous fragrance boosts energy and vitality.

Black spruce essential oil is used in aromatherapy as a nerve tonic and to help relieve joint and muscle pain associated with sprains, strains and rheumatoid arthritis.

Spruce – Hemlock essential oil

Canadian hemlock, or eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), is one of two Tsuga species native to eastern North America. In Quebec, spruce- hemlocks often grow in sugar bushes and mixed-wood forests. Spruce-Hemlock essential oil has a calming balsamic fragrance. Gentle and comforting, this oil promotes rest and relaxation.

Spruce-Hemlock essential oil is used in aromatherapy as nerve tonic and to help relieve joint and muscle pain associated with sprains, strains and rheumatoid arthritis.

Pine – White essential oil

Pine- White (Pinus strobus) is a tall tree found in eastern North America, Ontario, Quebec, and the Maritimes, all the way to Newfoundland. Considered a very hardy tree, the white pine can live for up to 400 years.

Pine-White essential oil is diffused to purify and cleanse the ambient air with its fresh and resinous fragrance.

Cedar white essential oil

Thuja, more commonly known as northern white cedar or northern arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis), is a coniferous tree native to eastern North America. The conifer is purely ornamental and is often used to hedge and enclose properties.

Cedar-White essential oil is used for its repairing and healing properties. When applied to the skin, it helps fight warts and reduces scarring. Furthermore, it can be used to stimulate and invigorate the scalp.

Larch Tamarack essential oil

Larch Tamarack (Larix laricina) is a North American conifer found across the Canadian territory and especially in northern Quebec. It is the only conifer that loses its needles in the fall. The tamarack shares its habitat with the black spruce and the white cedar. Its wood is resistant to rot and water, and is often used as timber and engineered lumber.

Larch -Tamarack essential oil has a fresh pine fragrance. It is used to help purify and perfume ambient air.

Labrador Tea essential oil

Labrador Tea (Ledum groenlandicum) is an evergreen shrub native to North America, ranging from Greenland to Alaska. Also known as Labrador tea, the shrub is called “Greenland moss” because it is chiefly found in this region.

Labrador Tea essential oil helps heal skin lesions. It can be used to calm hypersensitive skin and soothe allergic reactions. Thanks to its detoxifying properties, it can also help the epidermis repel pollution, and its antioxidant effects help fight skin aging.

Discover these treasures and enjoy an aromatic experience of our Quebec forests.

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